MGA Report Featured by The Center for Biosimilars

On Thursday, The Center for Biosimilars, a sister site of The American Journal of Managed Care, published an article discussing the differences between the patent systems in the United States and Europe when it comes to biosimilars. The article featured the latest report released by MGA, and authored by Alex Brill and Christy Robinson, titled “How Patent Thickets Constrain the US Biosimilars Market and Domestic Manufacturing”:

New White Paper Identifies Patent Thickets as Barrier to US Biosimilars Market and Domestic Manufacturing

“How Patent Thickets Constrain the US Biosimilars Market and Domestic Manufacturing,” authored by Alex Brill and Christy Robinson, explains how reference biologic manufacturers create thickets of overlapping, weaker follow-on patents to keep competitors from entering the market. The paper highlights how originators have strong incentives to protect their profit streams and have found patent thickets to be an easy way to significantly extend the duration of monopolies in the US, preventing access to more affordable medicines for patients.

Tackle the Tax Gap

The Senate Finance Committee held an important subcommittee hearing this week, “Closing the Tax Gap: Lost Revenue from Noncompliance and the Role of Offshore Tax Evasion.” The “tax gap,” which is the difference between the amount of tax rightfully owed by US taxpayers and the amount of tax actually paid, is not small.

Corporate Tax Hike Vs. Carbon Tax: Economic Trade-Offs

President Biden has announced two ambitious, entwined economic policy agendas: raising the corporate tax rate and other taxes on large businesses to pay for a significant increase in spending on a broadly defined set of infrastructure objectives. While the case for at least some increase in infrastructure spending is sound, the case for unwinding the corporate tax reforms enacted in 2017 is not.

Alex Brill Testifies Before Senate Committee on Finance on Tax Treatment of Energy

On Tuesday, American Enterprise Institute resident fellow and MGA founder and CEO Alex Brill testified before the U.S. Senate Committee on Finance. The topic of the hearing was the tax treatment of energy. Brill spoke of the criticality of a “broad, efficient, technology-neutral tax policy geared toward encouraging less energy consumption and more renewable energy production” to working toward a reduction in U.S. reliance on fossil fuels—and ensuring a reduction in CO2 emissions.

Unintended Consequences: Democrat’s Child Tax Credit Will Cost Jobs

President Biden’s first signature legislative accomplishment, the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA), is now law. Nearly $1.2 trillion in fiscal aid will pour into the economy before October, and another $700 billion will be doled out over the next four years. As one of us has written previously, $1.9 trillion is a significant underestimate of the plan’s total cost if temporary expansions of several tax credits are permanently extended. The largest of these temporary policies is the expanded child tax credit (CTC), touted by Democrats as a boon to low- and middle-income households. In addition to being costlier than the sticker price, a permanent CTC expansion, a goal expressed by many Democratic lawmakers, would have the unintended consequence of reducing employment.