MGA’a Alex Brill on KSRO

Brill discusses the opioid tax on big pharma in an interview for KSRO stating, “it’s going to result in higher prices for those opioids. But the out-of-pockets costs for the person filling the prescription is likely to remain the same.”

MGA’s Alex Brill on CNBC’s Squawk Box

“I think we are going to see in 2019 that it is a little softer than 2018. We just came off of a 3.5% Real GDP quarter. I think the consensus that a little bit of a slowdown next year is correct. That said what is keeping the economy going is in part a fiscal boost, a little bit on the spending side, and on the tax policy side, both putting cash in people’s pockets.”

MGA’s Alex Brill on CNBC’s Squawk Box

“We’ve seen three months of strong economic growth in the labor market and we are adding jobs. I’d also just add we are two weeks away of getting the state level numbers and I think that will be informative both with respect to the weather effects and quite frankly some of the political aspects. We will have a better insight as to where these jobs are being created.”

MGA’s Alex Brill on CNBC’s Squawk Box

“…. There are specific issues with regards to our trade relationship with China. But not only with China, with other of our major trading partners around the world. We are better off with good intellectual property laws. We are better off with lower tariff and non-tariff barriers. We need a process that takes us from where we are forward and not backwards, of course.”

MGA’s Alex Brill on White House Chronicle

Brill said, “If we take a market-based approach, which we think is a conservative strategy to addressing climate change, we want to use price signals, and a carbon tax is a price signal. It negates the need for…the regulatory toolbox that’s currently being deployed…and allows the market to find…the most efficient way to get emissions down.”

MGA’s Alex Brill on CNBC’s Squawk Box

“The trade news is a negative at the moment. Going forward I don’t think this is the way to grow the economy by slapping tariffs on the way that we’ve seen. Whether this is strategic or not is yet to be determined. Whether there will be some grand deal that’s going to be worked. But this is clearly something that should be concerning to employers. Not just those guys who are directly on the list today, but really who is safe? Some industries might be. Maybe it’s the hospitals, some really domestic type industries that don’t care so much about what is happening in our trade patterns. But I think a lot of folks are rightfully concerned about a new uncertainty in public policy.”